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Social Networks and Talent Strategies
published by , on 03/08/2009

All the chatter around social networking seems apropos considering it is—at its core—a communications media. However, examinations of the demographics, trends, and impact send some mixed messages. For example:

Facebook users get lower grades in college features an Ohio State University study where the 85% of students who are Facebook users get lower grades. Yet Facebook, YouTube at work make better employees: study highlights an Australian study where workers who use the Internet at work are 9% more productive. And opportunities abound as Social Networking jobs are steadily rising.

Meanwhile, the intersection of social networking and recruiting continues to be controversial. Jobseekers are counseled on How to Turn Social Networking Into a Job Offer while Bosses and Workers Disagree on Social Network Privacy.

The Consumer Internet Barometer found 43% of the online community now use social networking sites, up from 27% a year ago. But College Students’ Facebook Use Easing Up Over the Summer, While Parents Logging On in Record Numbers.

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The social networking demographic has surely broadened beyond Gen Y along with the applications of the technologies.

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